A new translation from the Old English.

The system of checks and balances, between judge and jury, established by the Founders of the United States in the Constitution, has failed, as judges have seized all power in their courtrooms, aided and abetted by other judges (the Supreme Court).

A similarly modernised version.

Each with a prose equivalent to aid comprehension.

An original essay on Poetic translation.

"...for I do believe in them," , "as none of my accusers do..." Sometimes it is said that the whole is an ironic put-on and that Socrates never does actually say he believes in the gods.

Translated from the Anglo-Saxon of the Exeter Book.

"...I would be teaching you not to believe that there are gods..." That is, if Socrates did what he considered impious, then he would have to act and believe as though there were no gods to punish him, and his actions would bespeak this atheism.

A new Anthology of 1400 Quotations from the complete works arranged by theme.

His drama, Andromache, in a new English verse translation.

Plutarch (c. 45–120 CE) wrote on many subjects. His forty-six are biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs, one Greek figure and one similar Roman, though the last four lives are single. They not only record careers and illustrious deeds but also offer rounded portraits of statesmen, orators, and military leaders.

Selected poems, in English verse.

Plutarch (c. 45–120 CE) wrote on many subjects. His forty-six are biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs, one Greek figure and one similar Roman, though the last four lives are single. They not only record careers and illustrious deeds but also offer rounded portraits of statesmen, orators, and military leaders.

Cyrano de Bergerac, in English verse.

Plutarch (c. 45–120 CE) wrote on many subjects. His forty-six are biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs, one Greek figure and one similar Roman, though the last four lives are single. They not only record careers and illustrious deeds but also offer rounded portraits of statesmen, orators, and military leaders.

The complete sonnets of Astrophil & Stella, each with a prose equivalent to aid comprehension.

Joachim Du Bellay's Les Antiquités de Rome.

Selected Poems from the French early to mid-20th century including poems by Apollinaire, Supervielle, Breton, Tzara, Eluard, Artaud, Aragon, Desnos, Prévert, Ponge, Char, and others (external links, opening in new tab).

René. A new translation of this key text of French Romanticism. The sequel to Atala.

Additional books from the extended shelves:

Moses
May not have been a real person. Which would kick him off the list. It turns out, however, that modern scholars disagree on whether it would be worth my time to research whether he was a real person.

A new translation of his tale of thwarted love set in Moorish Granada.

Thirty-seven poems in translation.

The and the of Homer (eighth century BCE) are the two oldest European epic poems. The latter tells of Odysseus’s journey home from the Trojan War and the temptations, delays, and dangers he faced at every turn.