The Big Apple: “The man who dies rich dies disgraced”

"The man who dies...rich dies disgraced." Such is the verdict of Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919), industrialist and philanthropist, in his essay The Gospel of Wealth, in which he claimed to "solve the problem of the Rich and the Poor." He asserted that the only creditable option for those with surplus wealth is to use it during their lifetimes for the common good, and that to do otherwise is a disgrace. He and an increasing number of wealthy individuals have donated and administered large fortunes for charitable purposes. But do these individuals have a responsibility to donate to charity? Should the burden of charitable giving fall more heavily on their shoulders by virtue of having more to give?

“The person who dies rich dies disgraced.” Discuss

Carnegie also said that "The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced."

The man who dies rich dies disgraced.

Not to do so was the worst sort of personal failure: “The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.” As a result, a far higher proportion of hospitals, libraries, universities and welfare services in America is funded by private donations than in other rich countries, where governments are spending proportionately more yet are still struggling to meet growing public expectations.

“The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.”

In the early part of the Twentieth century large monopolies ruled the industrial world bringing about long hours, low wages, and harsh working conditions. This was also the time when the thought or the attempt to unionize was completely out of the question as far as most leaders of industry were concerned. Andrew Carnegie was the one of the so-called robber barons that took a stand against the unfair working conditions. Carnegie preached the rights of laborers and felt they should unionize to protect their jobs. (Amer Exp 2) As a result of Carnegie's strong reputation his stand for unionization sent a message to the world that unions can and should be allowed.He persevered to shorten the average workday, and saw industry as a corporation between the worker and the employer. Carnegie felt that work and money were a means to an end. His goal in industry wasn't to become the richest man but instead to improve himself to benefit the greater good of mankind. He felt that the best way to accomplish this goal was through communication. (Bowman 68) Carnegie said that, "the man who dies rich, dies disgraced." (Henle 1) Throughout his lifetime he donated over $350 million to the public in order for them to have the ability to better themselves and to attain their goals in the future. Several libraries in many large cities were the result of his donations.

He warned successful men who failed to help others that “the man who dies thus rich dies disgraced
The person who dies rich dies disgraced essay

“The man who dies rich, dies disgraced” John Perricone ..

The man who dies leaving behind him millions of available wealth,which was his to administer during life, will pass away "unwept,unhonored and unsung".... Of such of these the public verdict willthen be: "The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced."

‘The person who dies rich dies disgraced.’ Discuss

the man who dies thus rich dies disgraced" ..

He persevered to shorten the average workday, and saw industry as a corporation between the worker and the employer. Carnegie felt that work and money were a means to an end. His goal in industry wasn't to become the richest man but instead to improve himself to benefit the greater good of mankind. He felt that the best way to accomplish this goal was through communication. (Bowman 68) Carnegie said that, "the man who dies rich, dies disgraced." (Henle 1) Throughout his lifetime he donated over $350 million to the public in order for them to have the ability to better themselves and to attain their goals in the future. Several libraries in many large cities were the result of his donations.

the man who dies thus rich dies disgraced." ..

who liked to say that “the man who dies rich dies disgraced