MLA essay format for first page

When using MLA format, follow the author-page method of citation. Thismeans that the author's last name and the page number(s) from which the quotation is takenmust appear in the text, and a complete reference should appear in your works-cited list(see below). The author's name may appear either in the sentence itself or in parenthesesfollowing the quotation, but the page number(s) should always appear in the parentheses,never in the text of your sentence.



Freud states that "a dream is the fulfillment of awish" (154).


Some argue that "a dream is the fulfillment of awish" (Freud 154).


Sometimes more information is necessary to identify the source from which aquotation is taken. For instance, if more than one author has the same last name, it isnecessary to provide the author's initials (or even her or his full name if differentauthors share initials) in your citation. If you cite more than one work by a particularauthor, it is necessary to include a shortened title for the particular work from whichyou are quoting.



The Romantic poets demonstrate a concern with the fleeting nature of life:"'My name

is Ozymandias, king of kinds: / Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!' / Nothing

beside remains" (P.B. Shelley, "Ozymandias" ll. 10-12); and "Theflower that smiles

to-day / To-morrow dies" (P. B. Shelley, "Mutability" ll. 1-2).


Some gothic novels feature a character who is in the throes of "the violenceof his feelings"

and "the dark tyranny of despair" (M. W. Shelley, Frankenstein 12).




Short Quotations
To indicate short quotations (fewer than four typed lines of prose or threelines of verse) in your text, enclose the quotation within double quotation marks andincorporate it into your text. Provide the author and specific page citation (in the caseof verse, provide line numbers) in the text, and include a complete reference in theworks-cited list. Punctuation marks such as periods, commas, and semicolons should appearafter the parenthetical citation. Question marks and exclamation points should appearwithin the quotation marks if they are a part of the quoted passage but after theparenthetical citation if they are a part of your text.

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There are special considerations for the first page of any essay that has the mla format

Format for a Research Paper - A Research Guide for Students

It will possibly be censured as a great piece of vanity or insolence in me, to pretend to instruct this our knowing age; it amounting to little less, when I own, that I publish this Essay with hopes it may be useful to others. But if it may be permitted to speak freely of those, who with a feigned modesty condemn as useless, what they themselves write, methinks it savours much more of vanity or insolence, to publish a book for any other end; and he fails very much of that respect he owes the public, who prints, and consequently expects men should read that, wherein he intends not they should meet with any thing of use to themselves or others: and should nothing else be found allowable in this treatise, yet my design will not cease to be so; and the goodness of my intention ought to be some excuse for the worthlessness of my present. It is that chiefly which secures me from the fear of censure, which I expect not to escape more than better writers. Men’s principles, notions, and relishes are so different, that it is hard to find a book which pleases or displeases all men. I acknowledge the age we live in is not the least knowing, and therefore not the most easy to be satisfied. If I have not the good luck to please, yet nobody ought to be offended with me. I plainly tell all my readers, except half a dozen, this treatise was not at first intended for them; and therefore they need not be at the trouble to be of that number. But yet if any one thinks fit to be angry, and rail at it, he may do it securely: for I shall find some better way of spending my time, than in such kind of conversation. I shall always have the satisfaction to have aimed sincerely at truth and usefulness, though in one of the meanest ways. The commonwealth of learning is not at this time without master-builders, whose mighty designs in advancing the sciences, will leave lasting monuments to the admiration of posterity; but every one must not hope to be a Boyle, or a Sydenham; and in an age that produces such masters, as the great — Huygenius, and the incomparable Mr. Newton, with some others of that strain; it is ambition enough to be employed as an under-labourer in clearing the ground a little, and removing some of the rubbish that lies in the way to knowledge; which certainly had been very much more advanced in the world, if the endeavours of ingenious and industrious men had not been much cumbered with the learned but frivolous use of uncouth, affected, or unintelligible terms, introduced into the sciences, and there made an art of, to that degree, that philosophy, which is nothing but the true knowledge of things, was thought unfit, or uncapable to be brought into well-bred company, and polite conversation. Vague and insignificant forms of speech, and abuse of language, have so long passed for mysteries of science; and hard and misapplied words, with little or no meaning, have, by prescription, such a right to be mistaken for deep learning, and height of speculation, that it will not be easy to persuade, either those who speak, or those who hear them, that they are but the covers of ignorance, and hindrance of true knowledge. To break in upon the sanctuary of vanity and ignorance, will be, I suppose, some service to human understanding: though so few are apt to think they deceive or are deceived in the use of words; or that the language of the sect they are of, has any faults in it which ought to be examined or corrected; that I hope I shall be pardoned, if I have in the third book dwelt long on this subject, and endeavoured to make it so plain, that neither the inveterateness of the mischief, nor the prevalence of the fashion, shall be any excuse for those, who will not take care about the meaning of their own words, and will not suffer the significancy of their expressions to be inquired into.

Citation Management | Cornell University Library

The Essay on Human Understanding, that most distinguished of all his works, is to be considered as a system, at its first appearance absolutely new, and directly opposite to the notions and persuasions then established in the world. Now as it seldom happens that the person who first suggests a discovery in any science is at the same time solicitous, or perhaps qualified to lay open all the consequences that follow from it; in such a work much of course is left to the reader, who must carefully apply the leading principles to many cases and conclusions not there specified. To what else but a neglect of this application shall we impute it that there are still numbers amongst us who profess to pay the greatest deference to Mr. Locke, and to be well acquainted with his writings, and would perhaps take it ill to have this pretension questioned; yet appear either wholly unable, or unaccustomed, to draw the natural consequence from any one of his principal positions? Why, for instance, do we still continue so unsettled in the first principles and foundation of morals? How came we not to perceive that by the very same arguments which that great author used with so much success in extirpating innate ideas, he most effectually eradicated all innate or connate senses, instincts, &c. by not only leading us to conclude that every such sense must, in the very nature of it, imply an object correspondent to and of the same standing with itself, to which it refers [as each relative implies its correlate], the real existence of which object he has confuted in every shape; but also by showing that for each moral proposition men actually want and may demand a reason or proof deduced from another science, and founded on natural good and evil: and consequently where no such reason can be assigned, these same senses or instincts, with whatever titles decorated, whether styled sympathetic or sentimental, common or intuitive,—ought to be looked upon as no more than mere habits; under which familiar name their authority is soon discovered, and their effects accounted for.

The days of the week were originally named for the classical planets
This is an incomplete listing of some very bad things that happened before the 20th Century

July | 2016 | myessays100 | Page 12


A book

Author(s). Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of

Publication.



A part of a book (such as an essay in a collection)

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Collection. Ed. Editor's

Name(s). Place of Publication: Publisher, Year. Pages.



An article in a periodical (such as a newspaper or magazine)

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Source Day Month Year:

pages.

N.B. When citing the date, list day before month; use a three-letter abbreviation of themonth (e.g. Jan., Mar., Aug.). If there is more than one edition available for that date(as in an early and late edition of a newspaper), identify the edition following the date(e.g. 17 May 1987, late ed.).



An article in a scholarly journal

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal Vol (Year): pages.

N.B. "Vol" indicates the volume number of the journal. If the journal usescontinuous pagination throughout a particular volume, only volume and year are needed,e.g. Modern Fiction Studies 39 (1993).: 156-174. If each issue of the journal begins onpage 1, however, you must also provide the issue number following the volume, e.g. Mosaic19.3 (1986): 33-49.


In this report, the theory of empiricism and rationalism will be discussed and compared

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Reflect on the video you selected and viewed from the DVD that accompanies your course text.

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