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-This is an analysis of the poem “Out, Out” by Robert Frost. you ,ust answer the following question in this order…
1. Identify the point of view of the speaker or persona of the poem. Explain the significance of the point of view ? speaker/ persona/ in a sentence or two.
2. “Paraphrase” the poem (should be the longest part of the paper.
3. What themes are explored in this poem? explain each theme in a sentence or two.
4. Describe the form of the poem. This may include identifying its type. (lyric, narrative, dramative, sonnet, ballad, etc) and/ or commenting on its rhyme scheme, meter, sound etc.
5. Describe the tone and style of the story. This may include discussion imagery, symbols, figurative language, irony, diction, etc.
Identify a significant quote. Explain why you think it is significant.

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In this little corner of the world, at this particular moment in time, Frost does what he does best—he tackles some of the heftiest, biggest, and grimmest issues of life by using understated, simple words and images. We're not on some great European battlefield, though we're talking about death; we're not in an industrial mill, though we're talking about work and production.

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The doctor comes to help, and amputates the hand. He puts to boy under with ether (an early, dangerous form of anesthesia), but the boy dies. The rest of his family moves on. Talk about heavy.

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A boy old enough to work labors in his backyard, slicing wood for the stove. His sister calls him for supper, and eager eat, the boy jumps a bit. The saw, almost portrayed as a character in its own right, nearly slices the boy's hand off—grim stuff.

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Shmoopers, hang onto your hats—we're headed into the deep, grim dark of the New England night. In 1916, World War One was raging in Europe, but American poet was out of the action, living on a farm in New Hampshire.

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"Out, Out" is the simple, sad story of a young boy who slices his hand off while cutting wood in front of his house. And he dies. If you're in the market for bright, flowery language and sunny skies, look elsewhere—this is Frost coming to terms with death in a time of war, but through the lens of the pastoral New England dusk. It first appeared in Mountain Interval, a collection of poems published by Frost in 1916 ("" was also published there). It is somewhat earlier than another of Frost's most famous poems, "," published in 1922.