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Richard Peter McBrien (born 1936) is the Crowley-O'Brien Professor of at the . He is a of the and the author of several controversial books and articles discussing . He is most well known for his authorship of Catholicism a book which received criticism from the U.S. Catholic bishops for advocating heresy and dissent from Catholic teaching. He also served as president of the from 1974–1975. In 1976 he was the awarded the for outstanding and distinguished accomplishments in theology.

Homosexual orientation among Roman Catholic …

Homosexual orientation among Roman Catholic priests

Roman Catholic and Church of God Teachings - COGwriter

ALTHOUGH CATHOLIC TRADITION, BEGINNING IN the late second and early third centuries, regards St. Peter as the first bishop of Rome and, therefore, as the first pope, there is no evidence that Peter was involved in the initial establishment of the Christian community in Rome (indeed, what evidence there is would seem to point in the opposite direction) or that he served as Rome's first bishop. Not until the pontificate of St. Pius I in the middle of the second century (ca. 142-ca. 155) did the Roman Church have a monoepiscopal structure of government (one bishop as pastoral leader of a diocese). Those who Catholic tradition lists as Peter's immediate successors (Linus, Anacletus, Clement, et al.) did not function as the one bishop of Rome (McBrien, Richard P. Lives of the Popes: The Pontiffs from St. Peter to Benedict XVI. Harper, San Francisco, 2005 updated ed., p.25).

Liberation theology - Wikipedia

McBrien, retired University of Notre Dame professor, author of many books on Catholicism and Essays in Theology columnist, has died following a P Mcbrien Essays In Theology His father was a He produced a syndicated theological column for the Catholic press, Essays in Theology.

Which Is Faithful: The Roman Catholic Church or the Continuing Church of God
Views and Reviews, by Michael Williams, COMMONWEAL - …

Don’t for get; we don’t make these up

The title of this study will reveal its Catholic origin as a doctoral dissertation, presented at the Gregorian University in Rome. The contents, however, escape the customary deadliness of academic theses, and offer an informative, appreciative, and systematic study of the prominent Bishop of Woolich, whose Honest to God has created so much discussion in the past three years. Father McBrien quickly characterizes the Bishop as neither a professional theologian nor a systematic ecclesiologist. But he does see him as a symbol of current ferment in the church's attempt to understand itself, and credits him with originality in the way he combines divergent theological, philosophical, and sociological trends, synthesizing and modifying these so as to serve a fresh purpose. After an introductory chapter, in which the course of Bishop Robinson's development is surveyed, the main writings of the Bishop are examined under two main captions: the Nature of the Church, and the Mission of the Church. Father McBrien finds Robinson's work superficial in the sense that he lacks acquaintance with important research in the area of Church doctrine, and in its ""patchwork"" character. At the same time, he is deeply appreciative of Robinson's personal struggle to find a view of the Church relevant to our day, and of the impact of his work, notably his Honest To God, and his New Reformation?--although Robinson's more scholarly works are not slighted. This should be helpful reading to churchmen, students, and laymen concerned with the debate set off by the Bishop's writings, and not limited to Catholic or Protestant markets.

History: Christian essay, term papers, research paper

History: Christian essays / Catholic Sacraments ..

ALTHOUGH CATHOLIC TRADITION, BEGINNING IN the late second and early third centuries, regards St. Peter as the first bishop of Rome and, therefore, as the first pope, there is no evidence that Peter was involved in the initial establishment of the Christian community in Rome (indeed, what evidence there is would seem to point in the opposite direction) or that he served as Rome's first bishop. Not until the pontificate of St. Pius I in the middle of the second century (ca. 142-ca. 155) did the Roman Church have a monoepiscopal structure of government (one bishop as pastoral leader of a diocese). Those who Catholic tradition lists as Peter's immediate successors (Linus, Anacletus, Clement, et al.) did not function as the one bishop of Rome (McBrien, Richard P. Lives of the Popes: The Pontiffs from St. Peter to Benedict XVI. Harper, San Francisco, 2005 updated ed., p.25).

THE CHURCH IN THE THOUGHT OF BISHOP JOHN ROBINSON …

The title of this study will reveal its Catholic origin as ..

A massive (1360 pp.), coherent, crisply written summa from a broad centrist viewpoint--but will the center hold? Fr. McBrien has long been known as an intelligent moderate, and in this monumental survey of Catholic doctrine and practice he tries to bridge the perilous gap between progressives and conservatives, to do justice both to traditional Church teaching and to the best in modern thought. Wherever strict orthodoxy is not at stake, he tends to take a left-liberal stance; e.g., he admits that Jesus was subject to ignorance and error, and did not ""found"" the Church. On controversial questions, McBrien concedes some ground to radical critics (""By modern scientific standards, the resurrection is not historical""), but insists on retaining a core of transcendence (whatever happened on the first Easter was ""real and historical"" for the disciples, while for Jesus himself the usual historical categories were left behind), And when the issues get simply too hot to handle, McBrien treats them as gingerly as possible. He thinks homosexual behavior is wrong--except for those who have no other ""realistic alternative."" He notes that the Church ""has never explicitly claimed to speak infallibly"" on morals (but what about the popes who have?). On birth control and the ordination of women, he summarizes the arguments without formally committing himself to any one of them. At times McBrien seems to be performing an intellectual tightrope act: he does it gracefully enough, but how many people will want to follow him? Isn't there a certain contradictoriness about an approach that can practically demythologize the Virgin Birth (the ""official Church,"" as McBrien says, may believe it, but he clearly has his doubts), and yet be impressed that Pope Benedict XII (1336) and the Council of Florence (1439) certified ""the reality of the beatific vision""? In any case, this is an impressive example of haute vulgarisation, an excellent textbook (for Catholic colleges), and an authoritative insider's explanation of where the Church is and how it got there.