The Thing in the Forest Free Short Essay Example

Energy is the master resource of all organisms, all ecosystems, and all economies. When a civilization centralizes its energy consumption, which were food and wood in preindustrial civilizations, to a central city, and it has to keep expanding farther and farther from that city to obtain that energy, the is going to reduce the EROI of those increasingly distant energy resources, and hence reduce the . Also, the practices of and agriculture provide short-term agricultural yields, but the wood would be almost instantly used (about 90% of the wood imported to Rome was burned, which was the typical ratio for ancient cities). The soils became eroded, depleted, and often abandoned as the land could no longer support farming, partly because the entire process made the land more arid. If they could import water to irrigate (usually a rare situation), that could help ameliorate the process, but it took more time and effort and made it more difficult. There were no accountants, scientists, or engineers monitoring and measuring the process, but all of those dynamics would reduce the system’s EROI and surplus energy and make it less resilient, so it was vulnerable to disruptive shocks.

The Thing in the Forest - Fiction Essay Example

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Into The Forest Essay 520 Words | 3 Pages

To briefly revisit , to that speculation above, scientists ideally want persuasive evidence that humans drove and to extinction. They want Acheulean or later technological artifacts associated with kills of those species. All that scientists have found for so far are some teeth and jawbones. Although such deductive reasoning is sound, the fossil and artifactual record is so thin that such evidence will probably never be adduced, even if it was a common event 150-100 kya. survived for nine million years and disappeared around when more lethal humans arrived, and a , soon after anatomically modern humans arrived in the vicinity. Is that a coincidence? There is genetic evidence that behaviorally modern humans interbred with , , and perhaps , and they all went extinct soon after those behaviorally modern humans arrived. That they interbred put to bed the hypotheses that they went extinct before arrived on the scene. If they went extinct after behaviorally modern humans arrived, as the genetic evidence clearly tells us, the implications are obvious, and any extinction hypothesis that invokes climate change or some other natural catastrophe has some high hurdles to overcome. Those events were probably early salvos of the .

Into The Forest Hero s Journey Essay - by Redding3645

Those issues will not be resolved in my lifetime, but migrated past Africa in the . There is evidence and speculation that those humans may have bred with Neanderthals, were killed off by them, migrated across Eurasia, or some combination of those events. There is evidence that or Neanderthal descendants, the , also migrated across Eurasia, perhaps expanding to Southeast Asia as did. The Denisovan evidence arose from analyzing DNA from teeth and bones, which is the only physical evidence of Denisovans discovered so far, and their genes are more prevalent in . To summarize, there is substantial evidence that the human line probably populated Eurasia in significant numbers by 200 kya, and perhaps even anatomically modern humans around 100 kya. They could have driven vulnerable species to extinction, with their advanced toolkit and hunting behaviors, long before behaviorally modern humans left Africa about 60-50 kya. became extinct in East Asia or the islands off of it, and the . Those two primates coexisted for more than a million years and disappeared concurrent with the rise of humans with sophisticated toolsets. They may well have been early casualties of humanity’s success.

Below are relics of the five stone tool cultures that scientists have discovered. (Source for all images: Wikimedia Commons)
Today, because forests have been cleared to make room for people, the grizzly’s habitat is shrinking and the grizzly is disappearing.

Ormana Doğru Into the Forest 2015 m1080p BluRay 1.70 GB Dual

The orientation of the Americas meant that few innovations traveled between continental civilizations. The only pack animals in the Americas, llamas and alpacas, never made it past South America before the European invasion. But there was a continual migration of innovations between China, Europe, and the Fertile Crescent. That is thought to be partly why Eurasian cultures became technologically advanced over those of sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, and Australia.

In the end of Into the Forest, Eva and Nell are burning the house, and leave

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When sea levels rise as dramatically as they did in the Cretaceous, coral reefs will be buried under rising waters and the ideal position, for both photosynthesis and oxygenation, is lost, and reefs can die, like burying a tree’s roots. About 125 mya, reefs made by , which thrived on , began to displace reefs made by stony corals. They may have prevailed because they could tolerate hot and saline waters better than stony corals could. About 116 mya, an , probably caused by volcanism, which temporarily halted rudist domination. But rudists flourished until the late Cretaceous, when they went extinct, perhaps due to changing climate, although there is also evidence that the rudists . Carbon dioxide levels steadily fell from the early Cretaceous until today, temperatures fell during the Cretaceous, and hot-climate organisms gradually became extinct during the Cretaceous. Around 93 mya, , perhaps caused by underwater volcanism, which again seems to have largely been confined to marine biomes. It was much more devastating than the previous one, and rudists were hit hard, although it was a more regional event. That event seems to have , and a family of . On land, , some of which seem to have , also went extinct. There had been a decline in sauropod and ornithischian diversity before that 93 mya extinction, but it subsequently rebounded. In the oceans, biomes beyond 60 degrees latitude were barely impacted, while those closer to the equator were devastated, which suggests that oceanic cooling was related. shows rising oxygen and declining carbon dioxide in the late Cretaceous, which reflected a general cooling trend that began in the mid-Cretaceous. Among the numerous hypotheses posited, late Cretaceous climate changes have been invoked for slowly driving dinosaurs to extinction, in the “they went out with a whimper, not a bang” scenario. However, it seems that dinosaurs did go out with a bang. A big one. Ammonoids seem to have been brought to the brink with nearly marine mass extinctions during their tenure on Earth, and it was no different with that late-Cretaceous extinction. Ammonoids recovered once again, and their lived in the late Cretaceous, but the end-Cretaceous extinction marked their final appearance as they went the way of and other iconic animals.

With no other option but to trust the wild animal they follow it deep into the forest.

John Locke (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

With the paucity of fossils, particularly between 2.5 and 1.0 mya, a timeframe in which the bones of only about 50 individuals have been found so far, discoveries are regularly announced that can be promoted as finds that will . That recently discovered better suited for tool-making, in parallel to developing humans, and perhaps is even a human ancestor, which would relegate to an extinct offshoot, not a human ancestor. With such a scanty existing record, such announcements can be more than hyperbole. There are often heated controversies over the dates of fossils and artifacts, in which changing a date can radically alter how the evidence is viewed. Many findings can change from minor curiosity to paradigm-shifting discovery and back again, depending on the dates assigned to them.