, he burned the tip of his nose on a stubborn flame.

Objective writing is also achieved through expressing your thoughts explicitly. The more specific you are with certain pieces of information, the stronger your argument and the stronger the supporting evidence. For example, instead of writing “most of the world,” write “82 percent of the world’s population.” Specifics help keep your writing objective and your argument credible.

Burning his nose blowing out candles.

The essential ingredient in a complex sentence is the subordinate conjunction:

Ronnie begins to sneeze violently.

POEISIS (from Greek poieo, "to make"): In Plato's Symposium, this term refers to act of creating or making something--both in the biological act of procreation and in the realm of the mind. It covers the action itself as well as the moment of transition where one thing becomes something new, and encompasses, as the character Diotima argues in The Symposium, all of the following (1) natural poiesis or reproductive sexuality, (2) poiesis in a city through the attainment of worthy fame, and (3) poiesis in the soul through virtuous habits and moral education. The word is related to the root of the modern English word poetry.

Sneezing violently opening the door.

Portis, Max Weber and Political Commitment, p. 72, quoting Weber from The Methodology of Social Sciences, trans. Edward A. Shils and Henry A. Finch (Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press, 1949), p. 72.

We looked on top of the refrigerator,  Jenny will often hide a bag of chocolate chip cookies.

Portis, Max Weber and Political Commitment , p. 71.

Thus, despite Portis' ideal vision of Weber's thought to the contrary, social science and political activity are compatible: The social scientist, in conducting research and analyzing facts, is necessarily influenced by his political position, at least to the extent determined by his ultimate values. Weber knew this, and exhorted his fellow social scientists to clarify both for themselves and for others the values driving their investigations. Such a clarification is the prerequisite to objective analysis of facts with a particular purpose or value in mind.

PRAENOMEN (plural, praenomina): See discussion under .

PHILOLOGY (Greek, "Love of words"): Not to be confused with (see below), philology was an important but now somewhat dated field of study in the 19th and early 20th century. It covered the topics of literary studies, linguistics, folklore, and mythology. Philologists were the ones who reconstructed proto-Indo-European, developed comparative mythology, deciphered the relationships between modern languages, and compiled records of regional folklore, fairy tales, and mythology before they vanished into modernity. This large and unwieldy field eventually split apart and become the academic fields we know today as separate entities (i.e., the distinct degrees of literature, lingustics, folklore, and so forth). Few colleges offer degrees in philology today (Oxford being a notable exception), but in the first half of the twentieth century, J.R.R. Tolkien was the primary philologist in the , which sometimes became a source of tension. C. S. Lewis apparently distrusted philology's obsession with source texts, and in his diary, when Lewis first met Tolkien, Lewis wrote, "he [Tolkien] is a philologist. No harm in him: only needs a good smack or two."

, she was only adding another F beside her name in Dr. Armour's grade book.

PANTOUM: A variant spelling of pantun (see below).

Participating in community service activities as a high school student can be highly beneficial, and not just in acing a college interview. Students who get involved can expect to reap many benefits from their extracurricular work, than those who don't.

After seeing the cheap tip, the man Ø  Ø wished that he had driven more slowly.

Weber: Political Writings, "Between Two Laws," p. 76.

PERFECTING: In the Renaissance printing industry, the term "perfecting" refered to printing on the second side of a sheet of paper after the first side of that sheet had already been printed to make a double-sided copy. In the 1500s, printers would typically do the side of the sheet in the morning and the side in the afternoon or evening. By the 1700s, it became common to use two presses consecutively--one side done on the first press and the other side done on the second press.

After seeing the cheap tip, Fernando, , wished that he had driven more slowly.

Portis, Max Weber and Political Commitment, p. 71.

Furthermore, again despite Portis' claims to the contrary, part of the power and allure of Weber lies in the dual legacy that he handed down: He succeeded, at least in the totality of his work, in being overtly political while remaining true to his integrity as a social scientist. At least one work by Weber -- his short essay titled "The President of the Reich" -- directly bears this out. And even if, as Portis argues, Weber did become psychologically tormented by the tension he felt between his need to voice his political views and his need to feel integrity as a social scientist, what allowed him, in the end, to succeed in being both political and scientific was his two-tiered approach to value-free social science.